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“Snatchback” went a lot further than “Not Without My Daughter”

May 16, 2015
Rachel Weisz in Snatchback

href=”http://www.upi.com/entertainment_news/movies/2015/05/13/rachel-weisz-to-star-in-kidnapping-thriller-snatchback/6891431524366/”>Snatchback looked to have been an interesting piece. This writer felt for women who lost their children to husbands from the Middle East. One other movie  claimed to have been seen by me was the one Sally Field starred in, “Not Without My Daughter” by Betty Mahmoody, that chronicled the abuse by her husband and the dangerous escape out of Iran with her daughter. At the time Betty returned with her husband and child to his home country, there was no American Embassy in Iran. Therefore, there was no way for her to claim asylum through them.

Here was what the Bible said:

Isaiah 41:10

10 So do not fear, for I am with you;
do not be dismayed, for I am your God.
I will strengthen you and help you;
I will uphold you with my righteous right hand. (NIV)

Even though there were a lot of women and young girls trapped in unwanted marriages, a lot of them were forced to leave without the children In “Snatchback”, Rachel Weisz returns to retrieve her daughter and becomes an ally for those who wished to have gotten their children returned to them after her husband takes her daughter to the Middle East. The character, ”Mo”, would’ve gone to any length to recover other families kidnapped children, while having placed her own search for her daughter aside momentarily.

In the article read by me, young girls were forced into arranged marriages by their families. Getting an education was exchanged for cooking, cleaning, and serving the men in their families at age 11 or 12  to prepare them to serve their husbands. Girls that ran away in defiance were tracked down and beaten. Sometimes they were locked up to prevent escape. Most of the time, the men they married were just as brutal as their families were.

Those that actually made it to a place of safety were shunned by their families for running away. When they ran from their duties to marry and be a wife, they shamed the family to the point where the whole community suffered or forced the family to suffer so they had to move. One of the sisters in the article was said to set herself on fire as a result of one of the girls who ran away. Her husband took the younger sister as his bride. Others were beaten, suffering broken bones, and locked away for at least six months.

Hilary Clinton, as Secretary of State, brought this to light when 300 Nigerian girls were kidnapped last year in April. She called it ‘an act of terrorism‘. Even though some did escape, more than 219 were still missing. They were probably forced into marriage. There was still a fight to put an end to human trafficking or the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.

The biggest problem faced at the moment other than the Isis threat in the United States, where  young people, particularly American women being lured overseas via the internet with the promise of a better life as wife in an Islamic country.

The sad fact was that, even though the 1991 movie starring Sally Field didn’t go far enough, it recognized the plight of women and children trapped in foreign countries unable to leave.  Hopefully ‘Snatchback’ looked like it went a lot further.

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